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File #: 1950-2019    Version: 1
Type: Ordinance Status: Passed
File created: 7/8/2019 In control: Public Service & Transportation Committee
On agenda: 7/29/2019 Final action: 7/31/2019
Title: To adopt the updated Columbus Multimodal Thoroughfare Plan as the official guide for future improvements to Columbus’ arterial street network, and to repeal Ordinances 2518-93, 1003-2004, and 2408-2015.
Attachments: 1. MMTP Map 7.10.19, 2. MMTP Table 7.10.19

Explanation

1.  BACKGROUND

The Columbus Thoroughfare Plan was adopted by City Council on December 6, 1993 by Ordinance 2518-93, and later amended by Ordinances 1003-2004 and 2408-2015, established the right-of-way widths necessary to accommodate future city growth, based on a model of adding vehicular travel lanes, but without specifications for transit, pedestrian, or bicycle accommodations

 

In 2014, the Connect Columbus initiative began in order to determine resident needs and desires for transportation options, including multiple modes. In order to use public right-of-way to meet Columbus residents’ transportation needs, a long range plan was established as a result of the Connect Columbus study.

 

In 2018, the Department of Development’s Planning Division established a new planning framework, Columbus Citywide Planning Policies (C2P2), to guide the next generation of growth and development in Columbus, and to serve as a basis for engaging civic leaders and community stakeholders in developing planning policies, including area specific land use plans.

 

The Department of Public Service established the Connect Columbus Transportation Policy Framework and the Columbus Multimodal Thoroughfare Plan to guide the next generation of transportation management, roadway design, and improvements in Columbus. Connect Columbus Policies are designed to guide decision making in a way to improve mobility and accessibility for Columbus residents, employees and visitors throughout the City with a variety of mode choices, increase walkability and active transportation opportunities, increase economic opportunities and access to jobs, improve safety, and leverage new transportation technologies and services to enhance the transportation system. As part of the Connect Columbus Transportation Policy Framework, the Columbus Multimodal Thoroughfare Plan supports the Columbus Citywide Planning Policies (C2P2) adopted in 2018.

 

This ordinance adopts the updated plan, the Columbus Multimodal Thoroughfare Plan, to replace the previous Columbus Thoroughfare Plan and repeals Ordinances 2518-93, 1003-2004, and 2408-2015.

 

2.  FISCAL IMPACT

No funding is required for this ordinance.

 

Title

To adopt the updated Columbus Multimodal Thoroughfare Plan as the official guide for future improvements to Columbus’ arterial street network, and to repeal Ordinances 2518-93, 1003-2004, and 2408-2015.

Body

WHEREAS, the City of Columbus in its daily operations must revise and update those plans and ordinances related to the health, safety, and welfare of the general public which pertain to the street system within the City’s corporate limits and in coordination with adjacent jurisdictions and transportation agencies; and,

WHEREAS, for many decades Columbus has had a Thoroughfare Plan which has coordinated the planning efforts of all involved in street transportation; and,

WHEREAS, the current Columbus Thoroughfare Plan was adopted by City Council on December 6, 1993 by Ordinance 2518-93 and was amended by Ordinances 1003-2004 and 2408-2015; and

 

WHEREAS, the current Columbus Thoroughfare Plan and Arterial Construction Types is now outdated due to significant changes in City Plans, development patterns and densities, employment and traffic patterns, as well as new and emerging mobility needs, technologies, and community desires; and,

WHEREAS, the Columbus City Council has endorsed the implementation of “Complete Streets” policies in Resolution 0151X-2008, and the Department of Public Service strives to design new streets and to continually improve existing streets to safely and comfortably accommodate all users; and 

WHEREAS, the goals of Connect Columbus seek to guide development of a transportation system that promotes community health and safety, neighborhood vitality, equitable access, fiscal and environmental sustainability, economic development, adaptability, and mode choice; and,

WHEREAS, the Columbus Multimodal Thoroughfare Plan is based on community and stakeholder engagement conducted as part of the Connect Columbus planning effort; and,

WHEREAS, the Columbus Citywide Planning Policies (C2P2) were adopted to establish a framework to guide the next generation of growth and development in Columbus, serving as a basis for engaging civic leaders and community stakeholders in developing planning policies, including area specific land use plans; and,

WHEREAS, the Columbus Multimodal Thoroughfare Plan is a part of the Connect Columbus Transportation Policy Framework and supports the Columbus Citywide Planning Policies (C2P2); and,

WHEREAS, the updated plan, herein known as the Columbus Multimodal Thoroughfare Plan, provides guidance to accommodate multiple modes of transportation and best practices in complete street design and transportation planning; and

WHEREAS, the Department of Public Service, in coordination with other City departments, is charged with developing the street system herein described for the preservation of the public health, welfare, and safety; now, therefore,

BE IT ORDAINED BY THE COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF COLUMBUS:

SECTION 1. That for the purposes of this ordinance the following words and phrases shall have the meaning ascribed to them as follows:

ARTERIAL STREET: a roadway whose function includes mobility and accessibility to and through various parts of the City and region. All roadways designated in the Columbus Multimodal Thoroughfare Plan are considered arterial streets pursuant to Chapter 4511 of the Ohio Revised Code. Arterial streets within the City of Columbus are further classified according to their context and function as corridors serving multiple modes of transportation at citywide and neighborhood scales. Multimodal networks, such as transit and bicycle systems, are part of the arterial street network but may also include non-arterial roadways or other alignments outside of a street right-of-way. 

CORRIDOR: a generalized alignment along which an arterial street is located. Corridors are either existing or proposed. Existing corridors are those corridors along existing streets. Proposed corridors are those corridors connecting two existing streets, to be constructed in the future either through public improvements or private development.

CONTEXT: a description of the adjacent land use and development conditions along a roadway corridor, including building types and forms, height, setbacks and densities, age of development, location within the city, and site access. Context can generally be described as “downtown,” “urban,” or “suburban.” Development context may change over time as new development and redevelopment occurs, presenting new mobility needs and new opportunities for roadway design.

COMMUTER CORRIDOR: any street, roadway, or highway whose primary function is to move people from one section of the city to another. Commuter corridors are typically multi-lane roadways with a minimum of four travel lanes and turn lanes. These major thoroughfare connections convey roadway users across town, and are typically adjacent to commercial and mixed land uses. Most existing configurations emphasize motor vehicle travel, with transit operating within mixed travel lanes. These corridors may also be designated as long term Transit Priority corridors, with associated changes in right-of-way design to accommodate high capacity transit service. Most commuter corridors will also accommodate pedestrian travelers and some combination of bicycle and micro-mobility devices, with facilities designed according to context.

COMMUNITY CONNECTOR: a roadway corridor that typically serves all types of roadway users, but tend to be lower-speed and carry lower traffic volumes than commuter corridors. Community connectors typically range from two to four lanes, with turn lanes, and with configurations designed to allow pedestrian and bicycle mobility comfortable for many ages and capabilities, with facilities designed according to context. Development context is typically more residential or small-scale commercial in character. These corridors may also serve transit lines, but typically will not be designated as high capacity transit routes.

SIGNATURE CORRIDOR: a roadway corridor whose continuity through the city makes it accessible to a large number of neighborhoods and is used by a large proportion of the city and regional population. Their combination of mobility, accessibility and adjacent development character make them integral to the city’s identity and economy. These streets serve as the mobility and development backbone for the city and are primary commercial and transit corridors for Columbus. Signature corridors vary in character from one another, and at different points along the roadway. Street designs and multimodal facility types will vary based on available right-of-way, development context, and mode emphasis.

FREIGHT CORRIDOR: a roadway located in a manufacturing, logistics, or freight district where special design considerations are needed to accommodate larger axis vehicles and larger volumes of freight vehicle movement. Pedestrian and bicycle access should be provided to accommodate access to employment, particularly in locations that connect transit routes to employment destinations. Freight corridors occur along Commuter Corridors and Community Connectors where planning and engineering judgement determines roadway design should accommodate larger wheel base vehicles due to the land use context is largely manufacturing, warehousing, or logistics. 

FREEWAY: a roadway whose primary purpose is to move people and freight across the region and having high speeds and traffic volumes, with no pedestrian or bicycle access. Arterial roadway crossings over or under freeways or at freeway interchanges should allow for safe pedestrian and bicycle movement through the crossing.

MAINLINE SECTION: that portion of the arterial street lying between intersections of arterial streets.

SECTION 2. That the map entitled “Columbus Multimodal Thoroughfare Plan” and identified and maintained by the Department of Public Service is hereby adopted by this Council as the minimum recommended standards for right of way width, to be allocated based on transportation demands and multimodal design considerations. This map serves as a graphic representation of the corridor types and associated right-of-way designations established in Section 6 (Multimodal Thoroughfare Plan Table) of this ordinance. Where there is a discrepancy between the map and table, the table shall supersede.

SECTION 3. That the existing and proposed corridors listed in this ordinance and indicated on the “Columbus Multimodal Thoroughfare Plan” map represent the arterial street system of the City of Columbus. The actual alignment and design configuration of arterial streets will be determined by planning and engineering feasibility studies with alternate proposals examined, and informed by existing and planned land use and development patterns along the roadway corridors.

(a)                     The Director of Public Service and their designees shall determine the appropriate street design configurations for all roadway corridors designated in the Columbus Multimodal Thoroughfare Plan based on industry best practice standards and guidelines, including but not limited to those established by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO), Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE), National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO), and any other rules and regulations as may be established pursuant to Columbus City Code § 905.04.

(b)                     The Columbus Multimodal Thoroughfare Plan and the stated minimum right-of-way widths designated herein may be periodically adjusted as necessary to respond to new conditions or transportation needs, or to reflect more detailed planning and design for individual corridors throughout the City.

SECTION 4. In urban context areas where extensive development has taken place, or where zoning overlays and/or Columbus Citywide Planning Policies (C2P2) encourage urban development forms with minimal building setbacks, or where existing building lines and urban development context prevent significant roadway capacity expansion throughout a corridor, the appropriate right-of-way is to be determined through the capital improvements and/or development review processes. In circumstances where full right-of-way dedication as stated in the Columbus Multimodal Thoroughfare Plan is determined by the Director of Public Service or their designees to be unnecessary or impractical, proposed developments shall be reviewed to ensure appropriate right-of-way is provided for curbside management needs, adequate pedestrian space or other multimodal infrastructure improvements.

SECTION 5.  That the following classifications of arterial streets are established as the desirable typical minimum right-of-way width for mainline corridor sections:

Thoroughfare Type

Typical ROW

 

Urban Context

Suburban Context

Freeway

Varies

Varies

Signature Corridor

80’ to 120’

120’ to 220’

Commuter Corridor

100’ to 120’

120’ to 220’

Community Connector

60’ to 80’

80’ to 100’

 

SECTION 6. That the list of existing and proposed corridors shown on the “Columbus Multimodal Thoroughfare Plan” are hereby designated as shown in the attached table.

SECTION 7. That Ordinances 1513-81, 1003-2004, and 2408-2015 are hereby repealed.

SECTION 8. That this ordinance shall take effect and be in force from and after the earliest period allowed by law.